Glory to God for All Things

The Life of Thanksgiving


This year I will make the annual pilgrimage back to South Carolina to be with family for the (American) Thanksgiving holiday. Fewer of my children will be there – a mark of the maturing of their own families and the difficulty of travel at this time of year. The year is different as well for it will be another Thanksgiving holiday without my mother’s presence (may her memory be eternal). With years, the life of my family is changing.

What does not change in this holiday is the centrality of giving thanks. These reflections make much mention of my late father-in-law, a man who was the embodiment of thanksgiving. He unceasingly gave thanks to God for all things at all times and lived as a faithful witness of the goodness of God. Glory to God for all things!

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Everyone capable of thanksgiving is capable of salvation.

Fr. Alexander Schmemann

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I do not believe it is possible to exhaust this topic. I have set forth a few suggestions of how we might build and maintain a life of thanksgiving. Particular thought is given to those times when giving thanks is difficult.

1. We must believe that God is good.

I struggled with this for many years. I believed that God was sovereign; I believed that He was the Creator of heaven and earth; I believed that He sent His only Son to die for me. But despite a hosts of doctrines to which I gave some form of consent, not included (and this was a matter or my heart) was the simple, straight-forward consent that God is good. My father-in-law, a very simple Baptist deacon of great faith, believed this straight-forward truth with an absolute assurance that staggered my every argument. I knew him for over 30 years. When I was young (and much more foolish) I would argue with him – not to be out-maneuvered by his swift and crafty theological answers (it was me that was trying to maneuver and be swift and crafty) – but often times our arguments would end with his smile and simple confession, “Well, I don’t know about that, but I know that God is good.” Over the years I came to realize that until and unless I believed that God is good, I would never be able to truly give thanks. I could thank God when things went well, but not otherwise.

This simple point was hammered into me weekly and more after I became Orthodox. There is hardly a service of the Orthodox Church that does not end its blessing with: “For He is a good God and loves mankind.” A corrollary of the goodness of God was coming to terms with the wrathful God of some Western theology (or the misunderstandings of the “wrathful God”). At the heart of things was a fear that behind everything I could say of God was a God whom I could not trust – who could be one way at one time and another way at another.

This is so utterly contrary to the writings of the Fathers and the teachings of the Orthodox faith. God is good and His mercy endures forever, as the Psalmist tells us. God is good and even those things that human beings describe as “wrath” are, at most, the loving chastisement of a God who is saving me from much worse things I would do to myself were He not to love me enough to draw me deeper into His love and away from my sin.

The verse in Romans 8 remains a cornerstone of our understanding of God’s goodness: “All things work together for good, for those who love God and are called according to His purpose” (8:28). There are daily mysteries involved in this assertion of faith – moments and events that I have no way to explain or to fit into some overall scheme of goodness. But this is precisely where my conversations with my father-in-law would go. I would be full of exceptions and “what ifs,” and he would reply, “I don’t know about that. But I know that God is good.”

As the years have gone by, I have realized that being wise is not discovering some way to explain things but for my heart to settle into the truth that, “I don’t know about that. But I know that God is good.”

2. I must believe that His will for me is good.

This moves the question away from what could, for some, be a philosophical statement (“God is good”) to the much more specific, “His will for me is good.” Years ago, when my son was child, he encountered a difficulty in his life. As a parent I was frustrated (secretly mad at God) and my faith shaken. I had already decided what “good” was to look like in my son’s life and reality was undermining my fantasy. In a time of prayer (which was very one-sided) I found myself brought up suddenly and short with what I can only describe as a divine interruption. I will not describe my experience as an audible voice, but it could not have been clearer. The simple statement from God was: “This is for his salvation.”

My collapse could not have been more complete. How do reply to such a statement? How am I supposed to know what my child needs for His salvation (and this in the long-term sense as understood by the Orthodox?). I had prayed for nothing with as much fervor as the salvation of my children. Ultimately, regardless of how they get through life, that they get through in union with Christ is all I ask. Why should I doubt that God was doing what I had asked? In the years since then I have watched God’s word in that moment be fulfilled time and again as He continues to work wonderfully in the life of my son and I see a Christian man stand before me. God’s will for me is good. God is not trying to prevent us from doing good, or making it hard for us to be saved. Life is not a test. No doubt, life is filled with difficulty. We live in a fallen world. But He is at work here and now and everywhere for my good.

My father-in-law had a favorite Bible story (among several): the story of Joseph and his brothers. In the final disclosure in Egypt, when Joseph reveals himself to his brothers – those who had sold him into slavery – Joseph says, “You meant it to me for evil, but the Lord meant it to me for good.” It is an Old Testament confession of Romans 8:28. The world may give us many situations, and the situations on their surface may indeed be evil. But our God is a good God and He means all things for our good. I may confess His goodness at all times.

3. I must believe that the goodness of God is without limit.

I did not know this for many years and only came upon it as I spent a period of month studying the meaning of “envy.” In much of our world (and definitely in the non Judaeo-Christian world of antiquity) people believe that good is limited. If you are enjoying good, then it is possibly at my expense. Such thought is the breeding ground of envy. The ancient Greeks and Romans believed this to so much be true that they feared excellence lest they provoke the jealousy of the Gods. We do not think in the same metaphysical terms, but frequently on some deep level, we believe that someone else’s good will somehow lessen our own. Within this eats the worm of jealousy and anger.

To bless God for His goodness we also need to bless God for His goodness towards everyone and to know that He is the giver of every good and perfect gift – and that His goodness is without limit.

4. I must believe that God is good and know this on the deepest personal level.

God has manifested His goodness to us in the revelation of His Son, Jesus Christ. In Christ, we see the fullness of the goodness of God. The goodness of God goes to the Cross for us. The goodness of God searches for us in hell and brings us forth victorious. The goodness of God will not cease in His efforts to reconcile us to the Father.

My father-in-law had another favorite Bible story (I said he had several): the story of the three young men in the fiery furnace. This story is, incidentally, a favorite of Orthodox liturgical worship as well. It stands as a Biblical image of our rescue from Hades. In the midst of the fiery furnace, together with the three young men, is the image of a fourth. Christ is with them, and in the hymnography of the Church, “the fire became as the morning dew.” For my father-in-law it was the confession of the three young men before the evil threats of the wicked King Nebuchanezer. To his threats of death in a terrible holocaust they said, “Our God is able to deliver us, O King. But even if He does not, nevertheless, we will not bow down and worship your image.” It was their defiant “nevertheless,” that would bring tears to my father-in-law’s eyes. For much of our experience here includes furnaces into which we are thrust despite our faith in Christ. It is there that the faith in the goodness of God says, “Nevertheless.” It is confidence in the goodness of God above all things.

I saw my father-in-law survive a terrible automobile accident, and the whole family watched his slow and losing battle with lymphoma in his last three years. But none of us ever saw him do otherwise than give thanks to God and to delight in extolling the Lord’s goodness.

Many years before I had foolishly become heated with him in one of our “theological discussions.” I was pushing for all I was worth against his unshakeable assurance in God’s goodness. I recall how he ended the argument: “Mark the manner of my death.” It was his last word in the matter. There was nothing to be said against such a statement. And he made that statement non-verbally with the last years of his life. I did mark the manner of his death and could only confess: “God is good! His mercy endures forever!” For no matter the difficulties this dear Christian man faced, nevertheless, no moment was anything less than an occasion for thanksgiving.

I have seen the goodness of God in the land of the living.

17 Responses to “The Life of Thanksgiving”

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  1. leonard nugent says:

    Father, this reminds me of C.S. Lewis’s famous saying about Aslan: “He’s not a tame lion; No, but he is good”

  2. Ioannis says:

    I never tire of accounts from your memories of your faither-in-law. Each story inspires me, and I like to hear them told not once but many times.

    My prayerful reading of this Thanksgiving issue 2010 drew my attention to the following:

    “Much of our experience here includes furnaces into which we are thrust despite our faith in Christ. It is there that the faith in the goodness of God says, “Nevertheless.” It is confidence in the goodness of God above all things.”

    “…Let us rid ourselves of every burden and sin that clings to us and persevere in running the race that lies before us while keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus, the leader and perfecter of faith.” [Hebrews 12: 1b-2]

    May holy angels guard the steps of travelers and join us in thanksgivings to the glory of God.

  3. Darlene says:

    I will remember such wise exhortation and counsel. This Thanksgiving I am struggling with what seems to be overwhelming sadness. The reasons are many, but I think the most accurate word I can attribute to this sense of sadness is disappointment. This disappointment is in myself and in circumstances of which I have no control, the only recourse being to pray and fast.

    In the midst of this sadness it would be most beneficial to say…nevertheless. Nevertheless He is a good God who loves mankind. “The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases, His mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is Thy faithfulness.” Lamentations 3:22-23

  4. Nonna says:

    “I have seen the goodness of God in the land of the living.”

    Amen.

  5. mike says:

    ….there is so many interesting thoughts in this post worth contemplating…I ask myself the question “do i believe God is good” and in the formulation of the answer my thoughts are somewhat murky..inbetween even..i think as Father Steven explains I confuse God’s chastisment for wrath or anger…and maybe sometimes the things that befall me are not ’caused’ by God at all but simply “allowed” (neutral?) within His all encompassing domain…..”“Much of our experience here includes furnaces into which we are thrust despite our faith in Christ.”…..its interesting too how interchangeable at times the terms God and Life are.. “God is teaching you a lesson/Life’s little lessons….

  6. To believe, really, truly, deep-down believe that God is utterly and infinitely good, and that in Him is no darkness at all, is very hard for us Westerners, who were raised with a “God’ll getcha” mentality. We have all struggled with it, and perhaps the remnant of the wrathful deity will always haunt us. I still cry when the realization, GOD IS GOOD, hits me hard and clearly, from time to time.

    Thanks for this, as for all your posts.

  7. Tyler says:

    Incredible Thanksgiving meditation. Thank you for turning my heart thankfully toward our God whose love endures forever. Amen.

  8. yudikris says:

    It’s very good. Thanks Father Stephen, this meditation speaks very deeply to me! Glory to God!

  9. Claudia says:

    The most calming and reassuring time of the Liturgy is when I hear Father Paul say “For He is a good God and loveth mankind”. It’s the same feeling as the Scripure recorded by St. Luke when Jesus tells the disciples, “Fear not, little flock. For it is your Father’s pleasure to give you the kingdom.” Makes me feel like a secure child being rocked to sleep by a loving parent.

  10. Yannis says:

    DId you really heard that F.Stephen?

  11. As God is my witness

    Sent via DROID on Verizon Wireless

  12. Christian says:

    What a surprise to surf in and see St John of the Ladder, which is just a few miles south of my house.

  13. Ibn Battenti says:

    Amen!

  14. God is indeed good! How can we not live lives of thankfulness?

    Thank you, Father, for this timely message.

  15. Mary Lowell says:

    Wow! I am speechless. Thank you Father! The Joseph reference got to me. Probably my favorite, all time, Biblical witness of God’s goodness in the midst of family tribulations, jealousy, evil intent, attempted murder, concealment, the list of hell’s temptations goes on. All reconciled by Joseph falling on the necks of his brothers in tears. God is Good!

  16. skholiast says:

    Thank you for this remark by Fr. Schmemann, which I had forgotten. I cannot imagine a more succinct account of the hope that is within me.

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