Glory to God for All Things

Saving Beauty

Everything is beautiful in a person when he turns toward God, and everything is ugly when it is turned away from God.

Fr. Pavel Florensky

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In thinking about darkness and light – and their role in our apprehension of the truth – I cannot but think about Beauty, which is a primary place in which the light of God is made manifest among us (if rightly perceived). The heart that is full of darkness cannot truly perceive beauty: the heart which is full of light, cannot help but perceive it. Perhaps a measure of our heart can be found in how we perceive the world around us: is it primarily a place of beauty or darkness? It is difficult in the fallen world to maintain a witness to beauty. And yet those places where it is made manifest to us are so poignant, so piercing, that I think we cannot and should not remain silent about them. Perhaps they should be shouted from the rooftops! This article is a meditation on beauty and its role in our lives within the Kingdom of God.

The quote from Pavel Florensky contains a world of truth, indeed, from a certain perspective it contains the whole of the Gospel. It is both commentary on how we see the world (as beautiful or ugly) or how we are within ourselves. The ugliness of sin is one of its most important components – and the inability to distinguish between the truly beautiful and the false beauty of so much of contemporary life offers a profound diagnosis of our lives and culture.

To say that God is Beautiful carries with it also profound insights into what we mean by knowledge of God. “How do we know God?” is a question on which I have posted several times of late. If we ask the question, “How do we recognize Beauty?” then we have also shifted the ground from questions of intellect or pure rationality and onto grounds of aethetics and relationship (communion). The recognition of beauty is a universal experience (as is the misperception of beauty). But the capacity to recognize beauty points as well to a capacity within us to know God. I would offer that this capacity is itself a gift of grace – particularly when we admit that the recognition of beauty is subject to delusion.

In a famous passage from The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky’s Dmitri Karamazov has this to say on beauty as well as delusion:

Beauty is a terrible and awful thing! It is terrible because it has not been fathomed and never can be fathomed, for God sets us nothing but an enigma. Here the boundaries meet and all contradictions exist side by side. I am not a cultivated man, brother, but I’ve thought a lot about this. It’s terrible what mysteries there are! Too many mysteries weigh men down on earth. We must solve them as we can, and try to keep a dry skin in the water. Beauty! I can’t endure the thought that a man of lofty mind and heart begins with the ideal of the Theotokos (Madonna)  and ends with the ideal of Sodom. What’s still more awful is that a man with the ideal of Sodom in his soul does not renounce the ideal of the Madonna, and his heart may be on fire with that ideal, genuinely on fire, just as in his days of youth and innocence. Yes, man is broad, too broad, indeed. I’d have him narrower. The devil only knows what to make of it! What to the mind is shameful is beauty and nothing else to the heart. Is there beauty in Sodom? Believe me, that for the immense mass of mankind beauty is found in Sodom. Did you know that secret? The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible. God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.”

Dostoevsky’s paradox, that “beauty,” for the mass of mankind, is found in Sodom, is a paradox that can hold two meanings. Either it can mean that even the corrupted “beauty” of Sodom can be redeemed (this is not Dostoevsky’s own intention) or that our heart can be so corrupted that we perceive the things of Sodom to be beautiful (closer to Dostoevsky’s point). We can also bring in a third – that of Florensky quoted above – that the “beauty” found in Sodom is corrupted precisely because it is turned away from God. It’s repentance can also be its restoration of true beauty.

I prefer this third thought (which is more or less the same as the first) in that it carries within it the reminder that when God created the world He said, “It is good (beautiful)” [both the Hebrew and the Greek of Genesis carry this double meaning].

We were created to perceive the Beautiful, even to pursue it. This is also to say that we were created to know God and to have the capacity, by grace, to know Him. Consider the Evangelical imperative: “Go and make disciples.” What would it mean in our proclamation of the gospel were we to have within it an understanding that we are calling people to Beauty? The report of St. Vladimir’s emissaries to Constantinople that when they attended worship among the Orthodox they “did not know whether we were on earth or in heaven. We only know that of a truth, God is with them,” is history’s most profound confirmation of this proclamation.

St. Paul confirms the same when he describes the progressive work of our salvation as “the knowledge of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” If we would have our hearts cured of the illness that mistakes Sodom for the Kingdom of God, then we should turn our eyes to the face of Christ. There the heart’s battle will find its Champion and beauty will find its Prototype.

9 Responses to “Saving Beauty”

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  1. lissi says:

    Praise GOD this is so true.

  2. Preston says:

    I have seen many beautiful things, sadly, I saw most while turned away from God, and what I should have seen as beauty I saw instead as meaningless. Now, having turned towards God, I can to some sense redeem that beauty, but I believe there will always be a sense of loss, of an opportunity missed. Yet it is a lesson hard to learn. My son is three months old, and when he wakes up at night I know I miss the beauty of these moments; that I could only grasp it truly when I learn to thank God for the moments.
    That leads to a question: are moments and visions of beauty like food, clean and truly beautiful “if received with thanksgiving” (1 tim 4:4)? By thanking God, can we redeem our idea of beauty?

  3. zeitungzeit says:

    I would say Father, that getting past Sodom (or spiritual Egypt) is to a great degree the same as getting past religion (previous post).

    For what is religion but a fixation with words that have lost their meaning?

    I cannot help but think (once again) of Matthew 25 and the transfiguring light that is everywhere present.

  4. kay says:

    Can I second Preston’s question?

  5. Preston’s is quite good.I would generally agree – that Thanksgiving is redemption and restores things to the right place with God – which inherently restores beauty to some degree.

  6. easton says:

    thank you for this, father stephen. beauty is something that moves me and there are no words, but you have taken away some of the mystery with your words…

  7. Alexander S. says:

    > when God created the world He said, “It is good (beautiful)” [both the Hebrew and the Greek of Genesis carry this double meaning]

    You may like to know that it’s the same in Russian. :)

  8. Victor says:

    Our organs of perception, physical and spiritual, are so disordered that we often set Truth, Beauty and Love against each other. Or rather, our poisoned ideas about these things squabble amongst themselves in our hearts.
    Where such a conflict arises I’ve found that it’s because either the Truth we are holding is not True, the Beauty we are admiring has a hidden ugliness or the Love we profess is broken and selfish in some way.
    Truth should polish the lens through which we perceive Beauty.
    Beauty should open our minds to more Truth.
    Love should bind Truth and Beauty together, holding them in His Person.

    Where things are not so, there is a lie, an ugliness or a hatred unrepented.

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